Sunday, 7 April 2013

Bangalore and its power

Many states in India have been facing acute power shortage. Our neighbouring State of  Tamil Nadu has been undergoing a severe power crunch and the State has imposed load shedding all over.
The sweltering summer coupled with power outages have made people really sweat it out. The demand for power in Tamil Nadu is about 12500 MW and the supply is 8000 MW, leaving a fairly huge shortfall.
The power crisis of Tamil Nadu and the declining storage levels of reservoirs of Karnataka have fuelled similar fears in Bangalore. Residents of the garden city feel that Bangalore too would face power shortage this summer.
Yes, technically Bangalore could face power shortage but it is unlikely to be of the magnitude of Tamil Nadu or any city on that State.
Bangalore does put a huge demand on the power scenario of Karnataka and the City is facing a shortfall of about 100 MW every day but this is unlikely to cause any major problems.
The 100 MW shortage that Bangalore faces is less than five per cent of the total requirements of power for the City.
BESCOM, which manages the power requirement of Bangalore and several other districts, says its total shortage is 600 MW for its entire network which includes the districts of  Tumkur, Chitradurga, Davanagere and Bangalore rural.
BESCOM pouts the every day demand of power by Bangalore at 2300 MW, while the State needs 6000 MW. Thus, we see that Bangalore needs a little more than one third of the power generated by the State every day.    
Since the peak supply, demand and non-peak demand and supply vary, BESCOM does not find it much of a problem to manage the shortage.
If you take the everyday average, Bangalore consumes 42 Million Units (MU) energy per day, as opposed to the entire State’s 140 MU. The transmission of 2300 MW through the day, leads to consumption of 42 MU of energy.
Why is Bangalore unlikely to face power shortage?
The grid that powers the State is the one that supplies power to Bangalore too. The grid includes power pumped from hydel, thermal and non-conventional sources like wind and sun energy. The grid also receives substantial amount of power from Central Generating Stations (CGS) like Neyveli Lignite Corporation, Kaiga Atomic Power Station in coastal Karnataka.
All the power units in Karnataka can put together produce 12,000 MW of power, but the actual generation is about 6000 MW. However, the generation of power from each source varies from one unit to another and from day to day and even during the day.
The major sources of Karnataka’s generating stations are Raichur thermal plant, the Shivanasamudra, Sharavati and Bhadra power stations.
Karnataka has fifteen hydel power stations - Shivanasamudra, Sharavathy and Bhadra-are some of them. The first hydel power station in Asia was commissioned in Shivanasamudra in 1902. Since then, the state has added to the hydel power generation and it today produced more than 3600 MW of hydel power.
Though hydel power is a major part of state's power, BESCOM gets only a small share of it. The major part of the power to BESCOM comes from thermal and non-conventional sources of energy.
BESCOM gets just 12 per cent of State’s hydel power for its entire operating area which also includes Tumkur, Chitradurga, Davanagere regions and not merely Bangalore. Therefore, the dependency on hydel power is much less than other ESCOMS. In a way, poor monsoons or reducing water levels do not really spell trouble to Bangalore.  
The State’s thermal power comes mainly from coal, gas and diesel stations. Raichur and Bellary Thermal Power Stations (RTPS and BTPS), and Yelahanka Diesel Generating Station (YDGS) are the State's major thermal stations. The gas fired station at Bidadi is yet to start regular production.
Unlike hydel power, thermal power is reliable and it is dependent only on coal. Only shortage of coal or diesel affect power supply.
Another plus for Bangalore is that the central thermal and nuclear stations also supply power to the State. The Central Generating Stations (CGS) fix quota of power to each State depending up[on its needs.
Karnataka gets about 1000 MW from CGS on average and they are mainly from Kaiga, Nevyelli and Ramagundam.
Independent Power Producers (IPPs) generate power from wind, sun and biomass.
The Load Despatch Centre of Karnataka Power Transmission Corporation Ltd (KPTCL) coordinates power supply to Bangalore. BESCOM informs KPTCL about its requirements and the centre looks after the supply.

                        The power stations of Karnataka are as follows:
Power Station
Type
Number of Units
Capacity (MW)
Total
Thermal
7+1
210x7+250x1
1720
Hydel
2
27.5
55
Hydel
10
103.5
1035
Gerusoppa
Hydel
4
60
240
MGHE-1
Hydel
4
13.2
52.8
MGHE-2
Hydel
4
21.6
86.4
Bhadra right bank-1
Hydel
1
7.2
7.2
Bhadra right bank-2
Hydel
1
6
6
Bhadra left bank-1
Hydel
2
12
24
Bhadra left bank-2
Hydel
1
2
2
Hydel
2
50
100
Nagjhari-1
Hydel
2
135
270
Nagjhari-2
Hydel
4
150
600
Hydel
3
50
150
Hydel
3
40
120
Hydel
4
115
460
Mani
Hydel
2
4.5
9
Ghataprabha
Hydel
2
16
32
Almatti-1
Hydel
1
15
15
Almatti-2
Hydel
5
55
275
Shivanasamudra-1
Hydel
4
6
24
Shivanasamudra-2
Hydel
6
3
18
Shimshapura
Hydel
2
8.6
17.2
Munirabad-1
Hydel
2
9
18
Munirabad-2
Hydel
1
10
10
Yelahanka DG Station
Diesel
6
21.32
127.92
Mallapura
Mini
2
4.5
9
Sirwar
Mini
1
1
1
Kalmala
Mini
1
0.4
0.4
Ganekal
Mini
1
0.35
0.35
Kappadagudda-1
Wind
9
0.225
2.025
Kappadagudda-2
Wind
11
0.230
2.53
Bellary Thermal Power station
Thermal
1
500
500
Yalesandra Solar PV Plant, Kolar Dist
Solar Project
1
3
3
Itnal Solar PV Plant, Belgaum Dist
Solar Project
1
3
3
Total
--
--
--
5975.91

No comments:

Post a comment